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Thread: Miss Geico 29 V3 winter build

  1. #1

    Default Miss Geico 29 V3 winter build

    Everytime I sell off one of my Proboat 29" V3 cats, I see how well my original Blackjack runs that REDLINE1 now owns, and fall into another one when a deal arises. This time, it was a bare Miss Geico hull that someone had started to grind out the stock mounting rails. They didn't get very far, but far enough that the job had to be finished and then rebuilt from scratch. It took the better part of an hour to carefully grind out all of the original composite mounting rail material and various battery tray tabs. I used a combination of dremel cutting wheels and sanding drums. To prep the interior of the hull for a carbon inlay, I sanded everything with 200 grit sandpaper and smoothed down as much of the factory drips and blobs as I could. Ended up with a nice blank fiberglass canvas.

    2018-12-15 13.46.02.jpg

    Then I started the inlay. I made templates for the sides, full bottom wrap, rear overhang, and front upper deck out of butcher paper. Transferred the patterns to 2x2 3K twill carbon cloth and outlined with scotch tape to keep the ends from fraying. First I put 2" carbon strips down the sides of the hull to reinforce the seams. Next I used one large piece to cover the tunnel, sponsons, up and around the sides, and just short of the hatch opening. Put in the small piece at the rear of the hull and then the front upper deck. I had been doing my inlays in the past using 3M adhesive spray to hold the cloth to the hull before it was wet down with resin. I didn't want to spray that inside in my tiny workshop, so I wet the fiberglass surface with resin using a foam brush first, folded the cloth up, and rolled out out into the hull. Pushed all of the corners and edges down with a roller, then brushed on another film of resin and rolled over it with a foam brush.

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    Last edited by fweasel; 01-12-2019 at 10:01 PM.
    Vac-U-Tug Jr (13mph)

  2. #2

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    Let it all cure overnight and was left with a much prettier, stronger blank canvas.

    2018-12-16 16.11.43.jpg

    Now I wanted to reinforce the sponson tips and deck bridge. I used three 20g pours of epoxy with chopped carbon fiber, one in each tip, and one across the deck. I put the hull in a water bath to control the heat and prevent distortion in the hull.

    2018-12-17 17.17.42.jpg 2018-12-17 17.19.26.jpg 2018-12-17 17.31.36.jpg 2018-12-17 17.35.13.jpg
    Vac-U-Tug Jr (13mph)

  3. #3

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    Similar task at the rear of the hull. I drilled out the strut mount to use larger hardware, installed T nuts inside the hull, and then poured an epoxy and chopped carbon fiber mix over the T nuts to strengthen the rudder standoff area. I coat the threads of the bolts with a little bit of anti-seize to keep the epoxy from sticking to them so that they can be removed later if needed.

    2018-12-23 15.23.51.jpg 2018-12-23 15.49.38.jpg

    Next up was a set of deck stringers made from carbon plate to stiffen up the front upper deck area. I make templates from cardboard first, which takes a bit of time to get into shape, especially with the shallow area under the deck of this hull. I then transfer the pattern to the carbon plates and cutout with a diamond coated dremel cutoff wheel. I made a similar set of stringers for my Genesis and they turned out awesome with one exception. I made them solid which gave me trouble when it came time to run cooling lines and power wiring. So, lesson learned, this time I used a hole saw to put holes in both stringers. Lots of access now. I tack them in place with CA, then mask and glue them in with dyed JB Weld. It was a lot of work to mask off the seams, but I'm a sucker for clean, straight lines if they can be seen. Once everything cures, all of the deflection in the top deck is gone. This particular deck wasn't as flimsy as some V3 hulls I've had in the past, but the point of this build was to build it once and never have to worry about it again. Still plenty of room to install flotation later on.

    2018-12-24 14.04.45.jpg 2018-12-24 14.13.37.jpg 2018-12-27 14.45.57.jpg
    Last edited by fweasel; 01-12-2019 at 10:07 PM.
    Vac-U-Tug Jr (13mph)

  4. #4

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    The stuffing tube was already installed and I didn't want to bother with ripping it out and starting over on its position. In hindsight, I probably should have, as it would have allowed me to locate the larger motor further rearward making COG adjustments easier. as it sits now, I can still get everything in place for a 30% COG when running 3S lipos. I mocked up the mount location first, sanded the mounting surfaces, and cleaned with alcohol. I masked all of the joints and then tacked the mount in place with CA. I'm using dyed JB Weld on this build, so I mixed up a batch in a small cup, heated it with a hair dryer to make it easier to apply, and brushed it into place. I used the hair dryer again to help smooth out the surface of the JB Weld and release any air bubbles. After about 30min, I pull the tape up and hit it with the hair dryer one last time to smooth out any edges that were too tall/thick. Let it cure overnight before doing anything else so I don't knock anything out of alignment.

    2018-12-26 21.48.38.jpg 2018-12-26 22.40.36.jpg 2018-12-26 23.33.22.jpg
    Last edited by fweasel; 01-12-2019 at 10:09 PM.
    Vac-U-Tug Jr (13mph)

  5. #5

    Default

    In my last Miss Geico, I installed a through hull pickup in the rear of one sponson. I used a rectangular, premade pick-up that I bought from OSE. This time I wanted to try my hand at making my own pick-ups from K&S brass tube. I drilled a small hole on an angle where I wanted the water pickup located, then slowly worked it larger with a file as needed. I annealed a few inches of brass tub and cut a piece off. I bent it by hand and filed a flat profile into the end to minimize the sanding necessary after installing it in the hull. Because I wanted my battery trays to run as far rearward in the sponsons as possible, I had to put a pretty good radius in the tube to keep them out of the way. This made them more difficult to make than they could have been. Got the first one installed and took measurements for the second. I screwed that up and ended up with a larger hole than necessary for the second pickup. Easily filled in with epoxy, but not as neat as the first. I filed them a little to create even tear drop contours. My flaring tool for brake lines didn't have attachments for tube this small, so I soldered on a small piece of brass one size larger to create a barb at the hose end, giving me a little more security. They turned out alright for my first attempt. I know I can do better on the next ones if I have more room to work the bend and a little more room between the hull and battery trays.


    2018-12-30 17.06.35.jpg 2018-12-30 19.04.22.jpg 2018-12-31 14.51.22.jpg 2018-12-31 14.51.49.jpg
    Last edited by fweasel; 01-12-2019 at 10:12 PM.
    Vac-U-Tug Jr (13mph)

  6. #6

    Default

    Time for the battery trays. I used a longer set of carbon trays from OSE and cut them to the length I needed. One side fit perfectly with just a few tabs needed on the bottom side of the rear corners. I attached those with CA. The other side was giving me fits because the contour of the ride pad steps was a little taller on that side. I sanded down some high spots with the dremel and also contoured the bottom of the tray in a few spots to get a tighter fit. Tacked them into place with CA, then masked the edges down both sides. I glued them in with black aquarium silicone which is by far my favorite adhesive. I wish I could use it for everything. It's easy to lay down, smooth out, cleanup and once cured, holds the trays down really well. Love the way it looks when done.

    2018-12-31 22.25.52.jpg 2018-12-31 23.52.23.jpg

    Servo mount was positioned so I could use a straight push rod for the rudder. I don't like to use bent push rods if I don't have to. This position also leaves plenty of room to attach the receiver and GPS on the remaining side of the tunnel. Once I had the location figured out, I sanded the carbon, cleaned with alcohol, and glued in place with dyed JB Weld. I prefer not to see a rubber push rod bellow on the outside of the hull so I drilled a 1/4" hole and glued in a 1" piece of 1/4" brass tube. I positioned it flush with the outside of the hull and left the rest stick into the hull. I installed the rubber bellow over the brass tube on the inside and secured with with a zip tie. For the steering push rod, I used 3mm stainless rod and Du-bro heim joints. Once I figured out the right length, I cut threads onto freshly cut end with an M3x0.5 thread dye. By far, the most aggravating part of this build so far. I had to back the dye off a half turn for every 1/4 to 1/3 turn I made cutting new threads. Finally got it threaded as far as I needed and the end result is a linkage with zero slop between the rudder and servo.

    2019-01-06 14.36.48.jpg 2019-01-09 00.10.36.jpg

    I mocked up the motor and MBP collet so I could finalize the angle of the front motor mount. I used a 3/16" drill bit in place of a flex cable, installed it in the stuffing tube then slid it into the collet, and tightened it down. That locked the motor in place while I tightened down the motor mount adjusting screws. Set the position on the rear mount afterwards and pulled the drill bit. I have a larger water jacket to install instead of the TP jacket. I don't like the TP jackets because they don't have much internal volume and are on the short side. The new jacket will be black and wrapped in a thin carbon veneer over the center section.

    2019-01-11 20.22.51.jpg

    Next project is an ESC mount, then I need to reinforce the hatch. I decided I'll use fiberglass on the hatch so I don't have to worry about placement with the GPS antenna inside the hull. Wetting out fiberglass is such a messy process, I've been dragging my feet for weeks to actually get that one checked off the list. I should be in the shop right now doing that instead of typing up this post
    Last edited by fweasel; 01-12-2019 at 10:19 PM.
    Vac-U-Tug Jr (13mph)

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fweasel View Post
    Similar task at the rear of the hull. I drilled out the strut mount to use larger hardware, installed T nuts inside the hull, and then poured an epoxy and chopped carbon fiber mix over the T nuts to strengthen the rudder standoff area. I coat the threads of the bolts with a little bit of anti-seize to keep the epoxy from sticking to them so that they can be removed later if needed.

    2018-12-23 15.23.51.jpg 2018-12-23 15.49.38.jpg

    Next up was a set of deck stringers made from carbon plate to stiffen up the front upper deck area. I make templates from cardboard first, which takes a bit of time to get into shape, especially with the shallow area under the deck of this hull. I then transfer the pattern to the carbon plates and cutout with a diamond coated dremel cutoff wheel. I made a similar set of stringers for my Genesis and they turned out awesome with one exception. I made them solid which gave me trouble when it came time to run cooling lines and power wiring. So, lesson learned, this time I used a hole saw to put holes in both stringers. Lots of access now. I tack them in place with CA, then mask and glue them in with dyed JB Weld. It was a lot of work to mask off the seams, but I'm a sucker for clean, straight lines if they can be seen. Once everything cures, all of the deflection in the top deck is gone. This particular deck wasn't as flimsy as some V3 hulls I've had in the past, but the point of this build was to build it once and never have to worry about it again. Still plenty of room to install flotation later on.

    2018-12-24 14.04.45.jpg 2018-12-24 14.13.37.jpg 2018-12-27 14.45.57.jpg
    Also doesn’t hurt to lighten up the CF a tad with the holes. Real nice work here Ryan

  8. #8

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    Well done and so much info shared. Not only is it useful to others, it's enjoyable to read and follow a build...

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  9. #9

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    Thanks guys. Building boats during the winter fits into my schedule much easier than running them in the summer. Hard to run boats at 10:30 at night 😂

  10. #10

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    I really like your idea of the water pick ups you made....gonna try this on my winter build..! Not sure why I never thought of it.....???? Thanks for all the info..!!

  11. #11

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    Real nice work Ryan! Can’t wait to see it run

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