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Thread: Carbon fiber for inlays, recommendations?

  1. #1

    Default Carbon fiber for inlays, recommendations?

    Hi all,

    What type of carbon fiber cloth do you guys recommend for doing inlays? What have you used and where are you buying from? Anything working better than others?

    Thanks,
    Ryan

  2. #2

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    I find Carbon Fibre cloth is abit over priced plus your not saving much in weights if your not carefull with the amount of epoxy or resin you using. have you thought about using Fibreglass Cloth of a good weight ?

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by rol243 View Post
    I find Carbon Fibre cloth is abit over priced plus your not saving much in weights if your not carefull with the amount of epoxy or resin you using. have you thought about using Fibreglass Cloth of a good weight ?
    Haven’t thought of that, planning to use this for more aesthetic reasons in a wood build I’m starting and then later for HPR fit up. I like the look it adds. I am going use some fibreglass cloth for reinforcing in some areas but haven’t thought of going beyond that, what’s a good weight for fibreglass cloth?

    Any difference between carbon and Kevlar in terms of workability?

  4. #4

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    I,ve never used carbon or kevlar , only fibreglass with either epoxy or resin. 2 ounce weight is good. carbon fibre cloth certainly looks the part when used as an in hull inlay as is no doubt better than fibreglass cloth , its just the cost difference that keeps me away.

  5. Default

    I have to agree that for aesthetic carbon fiber is nice but a well haind laid up fiberglass can do the job too.I use the 160g c.f to make most of my saw riggers and it can be used in your case as well.Take care with kevlar as it is a pain in the heck to cut it if your not familiar with this product.....I have a pair ofceramic scissors to cut it but there are other ways to do this task Gill.
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  6. #6

    Cool

    Fiberglass will never have the stiffness of a good carbon fiber inlay. I use carbon inlays where I believe I need a stiffer bottom, not for aesthetics. Most folks use too much epoxy on their inlay, it will be stronger with a minimum of epoxy.

    Heres how how I do it, either glass or carbon. I paint the surface with a good coat of finishing/laminating epoxy, lay on the cloth, soak that with more epoxy (use a paint brush) then I use a metal roller to push the cloth firmly onto the hull surface. Then I use paper towels to mop up excess epoxy. The cloth grain should show strongly after this step. After it dries I may put on an additional coat of epoxy if I want a slick, shiny surface. This results in the strongest, stiffest inlay.


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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluid View Post
    Fiberglass will never have the stiffness of a good carbon fiber inlay. I use carbon inlays where I believe I need a stiffer bottom, not for aesthetics. Most folks use too much epoxy on their inlay, it will be stronger with a minimum of epoxy.

    Heres how how I do it, either glass or carbon. I paint the surface with a good coat of finishing/laminating epoxy, lay on the cloth, soak that with more epoxy (use a paint brush) then I use a metal roller to push the cloth firmly onto the hull surface. Then I use paper towels to mop up excess epoxy. The cloth grain should show strongly after this step. After it dries I may put on an additional coat of epoxy if I want a slick, shiny surface. This results in the strongest, stiffest inlay.


    .
    Thanks Fluid, really helpful! I’ll definitely try out your technique.
    Last edited by R2315; 04-16-2018 at 08:21 PM.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by grsboats View Post
    I have to agree that for aesthetic carbon fiber is nice but a well haind laid up fiberglass can do the job too.I use the 160g c.f to make most of my saw riggers and it can be used in your case as well.Take care with kevlar as it is a pain in the heck to cut it if your not familiar with this product.....I have a pair ofceramic scissors to cut it but there are other ways to do this task Gill.
    The 160g, does that also dictate how tight the weave is?

  9. #9

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    I've also read that some tape it first where they want to cut then cut it with the tape on and then epoxy it in leaving the tape on the backside to keep it from fraying, Is that accurate? Any chance of the tape causing issues later? I guess once it’s epoxied in its not going anywhere.

    I've found a bunch of places selling this stuff, so many options... twill, plain, satin, spread tow, unidirectional ect... who have you guys had good dealings with? Just need a roll of something good quality with a nice weave.
    Last edited by R2315; 04-16-2018 at 08:02 PM.

  10. #10

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  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by dethow View Post
    Perfect, thanks!

  12. #12

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    I buy 2x2 3K carbon twill cloth from this supplier on eBay. They offer a number of different width and length rolls, depending on your project size. I create templates of the inlay using butcher paper and use masking tape to line the edges of my cutouts to keep the edges from fraying, installed tape side down in the hull. I spray the bottom side with 3M Super 77 adhesive spray before I put it in the hull. I apply my epoxy with foam paint brushes and then force it through the weave and mop up the excess with a cheap 2-3" foam paint roller.

    My advice is to start with smaller pieces and keep your templates simple. Larger pieces, with complex patterns aren't that big of a deal, but it takes practice to keep the process organized, neat, and clean and you've only go so much time to work with your mixed epoxy before it starts to set. The first couple of times can be clumsy, smaller pieces require less skill.
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  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by fweasel View Post
    I buy 2x2 3K carbon twill cloth from this supplier on eBay. They offer a number of different width and length rolls, depending on your project size. I create templates of the inlay using butcher paper and use masking tape to line the edges of my cutouts to keep the edges from fraying, installed tape side down in the hull. I spray the bottom side with 3M Super 77 adhesive spray before I put it in the hull. I apply my epoxy with foam paint brushes and then force it through the weave and mop up the excess with a cheap 2-3" foam paint roller.

    My advice is to start with smaller pieces and keep your templates simple. Larger pieces, with complex patterns aren't that big of a deal, but it takes practice to keep the process organized, neat, and clean and you've only go so much time to work with your mixed epoxy before it starts to set. The first couple of times can be clumsy, smaller pieces require less skill.
    Thanks fweasel! Great stuff, I’m definitely going to do some test runs to get my feet wet first... much appreciated

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