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Thread: BBY Micro Turbine Hydro for SSSH

  1. #1
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    Cool BBY Micro Turbine Hydro for SSSH

    As the founding member of the Santee Lakes Old Boater’s Society (the SLOBS), and “President for Life” (a.k.a. der Führer), I am always trying to promote our unique brand of FE racing. The boating area at Santee lakes is limited by several steel-reinforced concrete bridge piers and a three-ton rock in the middle of the pond. LSH boats can run in our pond, but they spend a lot of time turning real tight corners. Super-fast N-2 boats run out of room REAL fast at our pond. P-sized and larger hulls are out of the question. The bridge and rock do not move when hit by boats. I know this for a fact from watching other people try.

    Our motto at Santee Lakes is “Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control”, but how can you do FAST in such a small area? As many of you may know from the “Red” forum, I have been focusing on a spec class called Santee Sport Scale Hydro or SSSH for short. I have decided to post a build thread on this forum to expose more people to the concept of CHEAP racing.

    SSSH, like LSH, specifies a particular hull, motor, and battery combination. SSSH hulls have a 400 mm (15.7”) maximum length and must resemble a “real” hull (no outriggers). Plastic propellers (cheap) are required, and can be modified if desired. The SSSH “Spec” motor is a cheap 3000 rpm/V brushless outrunner that can be purchased on ebay for under $26 delivered, and that price includes a 30A ESC. It doesn’t get much cheaper than that. For batteries, 2S LiPo, or 6 round cells of 1000 to 1950 mah are the accepted cells. I have seen 1500 mah 2S packs at UH for around $10 to $12. This motor/prop combo draws about 10 to 12 amps so runtimes will be 6 to 12 minutes, depending on your setup and the current draw will be well below 15C for just about any setup. You don’t need high-discharge cells to race SSSH. This motor/battery combo has enough power to blow these little hulls off the water if your set-up is not right, so I would say that they qualify as “Fast” enough. SSSH racing specifies 4-minute heats on a 2-buoy course, sized to your particular pond.

    This build will be a Micro Turbine Hydro (MTH) from Blew By You Racing. At $30 for the hull, this kit fits perfectly into the philosophy of “Cheap” racing. I should be able to have this boat ready to race with receiver, servo, and battery for under $200. Using parts and radio bits I have lying around the shop, it is possible to cut that dollar figure nearly in half. I plan to laser-cut the internal wood frame, similar to the wood frame in the Campbell Classic Hydro kit. This is “prototype” work; therefore, I will not include the laser-cutting costs in my total, since this could be just as easily done by hand with a saw and some sandpaper. I’m going to do it that way because I’m lazy and I may have need for additional wood bits in the future. If it works out, I may make the CAD files available to Randy at BBY for his use.

    For this build, I will be using a 2 mm stainless steel driveshaft (no flex or wire drive), a 2.3 mm x 2.0 mm motor coupler, a micro brass rudder, and Graupner K29 propellers from MHZ. These props are cheap, ready-to-run, and require no balancing/sharpening. While the rudder is not super-cheap, it is cheap enough when compared to Fuller, Solinger, Speedmaster, and similar CNC-cut aluminum rudder assemblies. Furthermore, ordering all your bits and pieces from one supplier reduces shipping costs by spreading them around several parts. The flanged 2 mm x 5 mm ball bearings are available from Boca Bearings at a nominal cost. The stuffing tube is a carbon fiber tube that I got from a kite supply store (I have a lot of these in my shop). The I.D. of these tubes is a bit less than 5 mm, but some careful sandpaper work should easily re-size the I.D. to fit the bearings. In order to “keep it simple” and cost-effective, I will limit the use of carbon fiber to just the stuffing tube, and possibly the turn fin. All other materials will be of “conventional” construction to make it easy for everybody to duplicate this build if desired.

    I’ll post some photos of the current parts inventory later tonight when I get home.
    Last edited by Dr. Jet; 06-09-2008 at 03:08 PM.

  2. #2

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    "SLOBS",,,,, I love it !

  3. #3
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    We were going to name ourselves the Santee Lakes Unlimited Thunderboat Society, but somehow that just didn't work out.

  4. #4

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    You made the better choice!

  5. #5

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    I have been eyeing your other thread on this subject. I think this is great. This size boat fits a nitch that needs more attention. New technology has realy given this area a leg up and organizing it into a class as you have can make it stick.

  6. #6
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    I am all about this type of boat. I really look foward to this one!!!

  7. #7

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    Wish I lived closer to the SLOBS

    Jim
    "Our society strives to avoid any possibility of offending anyone – except God.”
    Billy Graham

  8. #8
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    OK, here are some photos of my inventory. You can see I am making a paper template for the forward bulkhead. I will scan it and bring it into AutoCAD as a photo image. Then I trace it in AutoCAD, print some copies, cut them out to test-fit in the hull. When everything fits, I do the same with the transom and the stringers. Then to the laser-cutter guy for a bunch of pre-cut plywood parts.

    The photos show the MHZ shaft and rudder, the bearings and if you look, the CF tubes. The little bit of aluminum angle is for the turn fin mount.

    Here is an interesting thought. I have some of Joe's hardware on my Campbell Classic. His equipment is some of the nicest work out there. How about a micro strut and rudder Joe?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
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    Default Part Numbers and Prices

    Here are the part numbers and prices of the bits I will be using:


    MHZ:
    Rudder Assembly, part m-1742/8 $24.50
    2mm SS Prop Shaft, part g-3276 $ 2.90
    Brass Prop Bushing, part g-3272 $ 5.00
    Motor Coupler, part g-3279 $ 8.70
    K29 Propeller, part m-2318/29R $ 5.50

    Boca Bearings:
    2mm x 5mm Flanged SS Bearings, part SMF52 (2 ea. Req’d) $10.80

    Ebay:
    Motor and ESC $25.98

    It looks like $94.18 (plus S&H) will get you everything you need. Motor, controller, hardware, driveline, and propeller. CHEAP!

  10. #10
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    Default Motor and ESC

    Here's a link to the SSSH motor/ESC combo. This auction ends soon, but just go to his ebay store, you will find more of these there.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/3000-Helicopter-...QQcmdZViewItem

    Less than $26 for a motor AND an ESC? What a deal!

  11. #11
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    Default Transport and Storage

    One of the many advantages to SSSH racing is the ease of transport and/or storage of your fleet. I can fit 7 boats, a rescue boat, all my tools, batteries, chargers, fishing poles, food, and drinks, in the trunk of a ’92 Toyota Celica and still have room for a few more boats.

    The attached photos were taken when my “Blast-O-5000” camera was having “issues” so the shots are a little fuzzy, but they still convey the point.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Dr. Jet; 06-10-2008 at 03:57 PM.

  12. #12

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    where is this lake?

  13. #13
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    Default Where is Santee?

    Santee is a small community east of San Diego. We sometimes call it Santucky, if you get my drift.

    Here's a photo that shows the bridge piers and the boat-eating rock.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14

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    that sucks, this is the perfect racing for me....cheap but im all the way in Orlando floida, we have no races near me that i know of. all the races are in tampa

  15. #15
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    Start something in your area. You can be an honorary member of the SLOBS.

  16. #16

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    well, there is a lake near me that is set up for rc boat racing, and iv seen people racing there before, but iv never gone up to them asking if they have offical races. i would lover to start a clone of what your doing , only in my area, but iv been getting kicked out of every lake lately. and im only a kid so i don't think i could make anything offical, only like fun get togethers...

  17. #17
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    The SLOBS are anything but organized. Generally, we "race" and the losers buy the winner lunch. That's about as sophisticated as it gets. The SLOBS have almost no rules, no meetings, no officers, no dues, no headaches. Welcome aboard.

    Build a couple of these cheapie boats and go out to the regular RC pond. Most RC boaters are not that familiar with micros, and they may be interested in seeing what the little things can do. Run them around enough and they may find a spot for you.

    Better yet, see if you can find a small pond and get the owner to let you run there. Since these are so small, you do not need a big body of water. Something in the neighborhood of half an acre is more than enough room. The small size of these boats also seems to lessen the perceived liability from the owner's viewpoint. You know, something like "Awww, what a cute little boat. How far away can you go with it?" is the usual response. How much damage can a 1-pound boat do at 35 mph? Probably a lot less than a 20-pound boat at 70 mph I would presume.

    Stay tuned, this will be a fun build and the results will be.........

    Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control

  18. #18

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    what you just said makes me feel alot better, i got my boat up for sale now, i have to sell my other boat in order to build one of two of these boats. i kind of like the mhz shovel nose, and the geko.

  19. #19
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    The Gecko is a RIOT with this motor and an 1850 mah LiPo. We spend more time laughing at the antics they perform rather than racing them.
    Last edited by Dr. Jet; 06-10-2008 at 06:22 PM.

  20. #20

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    ya they sound like fun. but im pretty busy also though, i have band pratice all the time, so im thinking of ether an mhz boat or the aquacraft alligator tour boat seems like alot of fun also.

  21. #21

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    Hi Dr. Jet!

    I thought this was the forum your were talking about. Thanks for the link! I really like your concept. I have two boys who I would love to get involved with this, and at these prices I think it's really feasible. I will keep watching this thread to see what you do with them.

    Thanks,
    Mike

  22. #22

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    Dr. Jet

    You are the man and I believe I have the stature of honourary member from 3 months ago.

    Cheers

    Douggie

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Jet View Post
    OK, here are some photos of my inventory. You can see I am making a paper template for the forward bulkhead. I will scan it and bring it into AutoCAD as a photo image. Then I trace it in AutoCAD, print some copies, cut them out to test-fit in the hull. When everything fits, I do the same with the transom and the stringers. Then to the laser-cutter guy for a bunch of pre-cut plywood parts.

    The photos show the MHZ shaft and rudder, the bearings and if you look, the CF tubes. The little bit of aluminum angle is for the turn fin mount.

    Here is an interesting thought. I have some of Joe's hardware on my Campbell Classic. His equipment is some of the nicest work out there. How about a micro strut and rudder Joe?
    It's something that has been on and off the table for a couple years. Maybe now is the time. Hardware does seem to be the sticking point with micros.

  24. #24
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    The Gecko is real quick to build. It comes with hardware and driveshaft installed. The hardest part is enlarging the motor mount holes for the bigger screws and filing down the sides of the motor mount tube to make room for the heads of the motor mounting screws.

  25. #25
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    Wow, two posts while I was typing that last one!

    Douggie,

    There are SLOBS popping up everywhere!!!

    Joe,

    I'd love to see what you would create.
    Last edited by Dr. Jet; 06-11-2008 at 12:19 PM. Reason: Capitalization

  26. #26

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    What is the transom width and height on the bby hydro? I will do some chewing on it.

  27. #27
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    Default Transom dimensions

    Allowing for some trimming, 1/2" high x 4-1/8" wide.

  28. #28
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    Default Motor and ESC

    Here's the "Spec" motor and controller.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  29. #29
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    My first group of photos showed the MHZ 2mm stainless steel propshaft. This particular shaft has been shortened to fit the Geckos. I do not recall exactly how much I cut off to make them fit. I just ordered more propshafts from MHZ, and my plan is to size everything and locate the motor according to the full length of the stock shaft with no trimming. The idea here is that the longer the shaft is; the flatter the propshaft angle will be. When the propshafts arrive, I’ll cut a stuffing tube to length, and have my driveline ready to install. Cheap and simple! For those planning a similar build, not cutting the propshafts is one less step in building your SSSH racer.

    I already have the motor and coupler drawn in AutoCAD; so once I have the exact length measurement of the shaft, I can finalize the motor location and shaft angle. Once I have that, I can start designing the plywood parts.

    Stay tuned for more.

  30. #30
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    Default Designing the Internal Framework

    I will be starting on my preliminary CAD drawings for the wood parts when I get home tonight. At this point, without the driveshaft, I will focus on the forward bulkhead, the stringers, and the transom. My ultimate goal is to tie all the various structural members together to eliminate stress risers or flex points, and create a light, yet stiff structure.

    To this end, the motor mount will be tied to the forward bulkhead and the stuffing tube, and this entire assembly will be tied to the transom. This should eliminate hull flex where the stuffing tube passes through it, and maintain motor/prop shaft alignment. The motor mounting holes will be “slots” to allow easy motor installation and removal in a somewhat cramped area. The transom and forward bulkhead will be tied to the stringers, which should yield a very stiff structure without a lot of weight. The framework alone will have very little resistance to tensional loads; however, when “skinned” with the hull which will act as a shear member, the resulting structure should be extremely stiff, especially considering the small size. Remember that the bending moment of a piece is essentially a function of the cube of the aspect ratio of the part, and the smaller the part, the stiffer it is. This same stiff structure result has been achieved in the Campbell Classic, and now in the Vac-U-Pickle. The plywood parts for the MTH will have a “lattice” appearance to reduce weight while maintaining the shear resistance of the individual plywood parts. For test-fitting, I will run a print of the drawings, and paste them on some scrap balsa I have in my shop. Then, I will rough-cut the parts from the aforementioned balsa sheet (without the lattice work, of course) with an X-Acto knife and test-fit them in the hull to confirm that everything fits according to plan.

    When everything fits, it will be time to start talking to the laser-guy.

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